It’s time to get smart

[fa icon='calendar'] Sep 17, 2015 1:55:01 PM / by Brittney Borowicz posted in connected products, customers, ECN Magazine, Featured In, General, internet, Internet of Things, IoT, manufacturers, smart home, smart house, smart products

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

Connected products also are a smart play for manufacturers by enabling them to stay connected with their customers like never before. Smart products can deliver maintenance reminders, special offers, recall notices and other notifications at prescribed intervals. The data captured by these devices can help manufacturers get to know their customers better. For example, by gathering usage data, washing machine manufacturers can know which of the functions owners use most, helping with future product development. Sensors in the appliances can trigger alerts when a component is about to fail, allowing customers to set up service calls proactively, which boosts customer loyalty. Even information about how much detergent customers use, water temperature preferences and wash cycle choices could be packaged and sold to detergent companies as consumer insight information.

At the same time, connected devices are becoming fairly inexpensive to manufacture, and they can be sold with a higher price tag. In general, connectivity can be added for a material cost of about $10, plus the cost for app development and cloud hosting. While lower cost devices, such as coffee makers or toasters, may not be able to support the added cost, larger ticket items (washers/dryers and refrigerators, for example) can. Much of it depends on the added convenience and value the connected device brings to the consumer.

The possibilities presented by smart products are very attractive, so designers are thinking of ways to add connectivity to products. Along with adding the Internet component, smart products present other unique design considerations.

Read more at ECN Magazine or download the PDF now.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Data Analytics and the Internet of Things

[fa icon='calendar'] Aug 31, 2015 8:17:29 AM / by Brittney Borowicz posted in analytics, Big data, connected devices, data, data security, General, Internet of Things, IoT, manufacturers, pedometer, security, Sensors

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

One of the major promises that discussions of the Internet of Things (IoT) have put forward, is the advances to be made in consumer insight. The idea is that sensors and connected devices can send data on an open loop back to the manufacturer for analysis. This process would presumably secure many advances in a wide variety of things; not only would companies be able to understand their clients, but sensors may even be able to tell us more about the product in general. For example, pedometers on livestock have given scientists more knowledge about when cows are in heat, allowing for a 66% increase in insemination rates.

Many have referenced discoveries such as these to be the real goldmine of the IoT. Using big data analytics, manufacturers could generate the type of insight that could propel future developments. However, the concept of big data analytics is still a bit fuzzy to most people. A lot of the general knowledge of analytics is overshadowed by the half-belief that information is fed to a group of ancient mystic palm readers who come up with practical applications for the infinite mass of soundbite data. In reality, the sorting mechanism used to interpret the data from connected sensors is rarely earth-shattering and could even be accomplished on a closed loop. This is critical to keep in mind, especially as companies make decisions regarding data security.

Read more at ReCode.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

APPNATION IoT Influencers Summit Panel: THE CONNECTED HOME – THE PLATFORM WARS

[fa icon='calendar'] Jun 23, 2015 1:34:15 PM / by Brittney Borowicz posted in Adam Justice, APPNATION, August, CA, California, connected home, connectsense, Consumer, Events, General, Internet of Things, IoT, IoT Influencers Summit, Iris, Jason Johnson, Kris Bowring, Levi's Stadium, Logitech, Lowe's, manufacturers, Mark Spates, Santa Clara, Schlage, smart home

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

 

IoT-Logo1

When: June 21, 2015, 12:10pm
Where: Stage 1A, Levi's Stadium - Santa Clara, CA

The connected home has emerged as an epic battleground for the consumer. Dozens of companies are vying to be the primary gateway and on-boarding point for the connected home and literally hundreds of hardware manufacturers and app developers are competing to capture our attention (and money) while we are in our connected homes. This session will dive-in to the broader connected home platform debate and discussion and the related app development and consumer engagement opportunities.

SESSION LEADER: MARK SPATES, HEAD OF CONNECTED HOME, LOGITECH

PANELISTS:

  • JASON JOHNSON, FOUNDER & CEO, AUGUST
  • ROB MARTENS, DIRECTOR OF CONNECTIVITY PLATFORMS, SCHLAGE (ALLEGION BRANDS)
  • KRIS BOWRING, DIRECTOR, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, IRIS (LOWE’S)
  • ADAM JUSTICE, VP & GM, GRID CONNECT

Conference Website: http://iotinfluencers.com/siliconvalley/

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

10 Internet of Things design considerations

[fa icon='calendar'] Feb 6, 2015 10:25:24 AM / by Brittney Borowicz posted in antenna, Apple HomeKit, Bluetooth, cloud applications, communication, consumers, cost, Embedded Computing Design, Ethernet, FCC certification, Featured In, gateway, General, internet, Internet of Things, IoT, IoT device, manufacturers, network, networking, networking technologies, power source, router, security, smart products, SSL, technology, Wi-Fi, wifi, Wireless

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

Connecting products to the Internet of Things (IoT) is essential to manufacturers looking to stay competitive within their industry. Adding IoT capabilities gives consumers more features. It also allows the manufacturer to stay connected with their customer while discovering new product use cases and applications that open them up to new revenue streams. When designing your first IoT device, there are 10 things to keep in mind...

Read more at Embedded Computing Design or download the PDF now.

10IOTDESIGNCONSIDERATIONS_BANNER

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

10 Internet of Things (IoT) Design Considerations: Interoperability and Security

[fa icon='calendar'] Feb 2, 2015 6:21:26 AM / by Brittney Borowicz posted in AllJoyn, AllSeen Alliance, Apple, business, cloud apps, end-to-end solutions, ETSI, General, Google, HomeKit, IETF, Internet of Things, internet standards, interoperability, IoT, IoT solutions, IoT space, IoT standards, manufacturers, Microsoft, Nest, protocols, Samsung, security, security threats, Sony, Telecom, Thread, White Papers

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

9. Interoperability

As more manufacturers enable their products for the IoT, consumers will be introduced to many different cloud applications due to lack of cooperation between difference devices and companies. This is where the emerging IoT standards can help. Device manufacturers who support these standards will be able to ensure their products will be able to work and communicate with other manufacturers’ products that support the same protocols. This makes operating many IoT-enabled devices together much more simple and convenient. This also opens up new business opportunities by allowing for new features that the original manufacturers never dreamed of. For example, interoperability means that one day it might be possible for a consumer to simply say, “good night, house” to their app, and the app will programmatically turn-off all of the main house lights, TV’s and appliances and turn on the outside lighting, set the alarm clock for the morning and set the coffee pot to start brewing when the sun rises. In this example, each device could be from a different manufacturer, but since they all support the same standard, the application knows how to talk to them all and create new service offerings.

Some of the emerging interoperability standards include: Thread (supported by the likes of Google/Nest, Samsung and more), HomeKit (supported by Apple), AllJoyn (supported by Microsoft and Sony, part of the AllSeen Alliance), IETF (an internet standards body) and ETSI (a European-based standards organization – primarily in Telecom). The standards landscape is changing rapidly and manufacturers need to adapt their products to work with these standards as they are consolidated and settled in the future.

10. Security

Building a secure IoT-enabled device comes at a cost. As the IoT continues to grow, there is an increasing focus on its security and how safe the claims of end-to-end solutions really are. While security threats in the news have scared away some manufacturers and consumers from entering the IoT space, others view it as an opportunity for added value to their products. Implementing high-cost security into every product a company has is ideal, however not very economical. Manufacturers must find proper security for each of their IoT solutions while keeping costs down for them and their end-user.

This process must start at the time of a product's conception. Proper due-diligence is required from each manufacturer to find a way to secure their devices, protect their consumer and ultimately, the rest of the IoT world as well.

10IOTDESIGNCONSIDERATIONS_BANNER

>  For more information, please call Grid Connect Inc. at +1 (630) 245-1445, or email us at iot@gridconnect.com.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

10 Internet of Things (IoT) Design Considerations: Features and User Interface

[fa icon='calendar'] Jan 12, 2015 1:46:31 PM / by Brittney Borowicz posted in app, business owners, Cloud, connected devices, connectivity, consumers, engineers, features, General, Internet of Things, IoT, laptop, manufacturers, networking technologies, product, product design, smart home, smart phone, soft access point, soft AP, tablet, UI, user interface, Wi-Fi, White Papers, Wi-Fi modules

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

3. Features

The IoT allows companies to add features to their product that were never possible before. These features have a wide range of benefits and functions including automatic software updates (over-the-air), smart home and office connectivity, reminders for maintenance, special offers, recall notices and upgrades and remote or local access and control. It is also important for designers to work with their marketing team to be sure the features desired by marketing are not limited by the hardware and networking technologies selected by the engineers.

These features extend new benefits to manufacturers as well. The features that consumers use can provide manufacturers with valuable insight to their products and applications of those products. For example, washing machine may have 20 different functions on it, but because it is connected, the manufacturer can learn which functions the consumer uses and why and then improve the washer’s product design over time. This same connected washing machine can also email or call its owner to let them know when a part is starting to fail and needs to be fixed before a problem arises. These new features also open the manufacturer to new revenue streams presented by the data collected from the smart device. A company that sells a connected washing machine can sell data on detergent use to the companies that carry those products so that they can have better information on their customer as well.

4. User Interface

Today’s consumers and business owners expect multiple ways to access and control the world around them. How are your buyers going to interface with your product? Options are numerous and range from using a smart home panel or gateway to an on-product LCD/LED display that can be paired with LEDs or push buttons. In addition, apps to monitor and control connected devices can be web-based or available for on-the-go consumers with smart phones. The type of product and its possible use-cases are important considerations when designing a product that can communicate information to its user.

Wi-Fi-enabled IoT devices may have the ability to act as a soft access point (soft AP) to allow a user to “join” its network locally with a smart phone, laptop or tablet. Soft APs make product LED/LCD displays unnecessary since the screen of the connected device will serve the same purpose.

Using a soft AP does not preclude the module from also connecting to the Internet and cloud-based services with some Wi-Fi modules. This dual-mode is very attractive because the user can access the product remotely and locally, depending on the features and use-cases for the product.

10IOTDESIGNCONSIDERATIONS_BANNER

>  For more information, please call Grid Connect Inc. at +1 (630) 245-1445, or email us at iot@gridconnect.com.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

10 Internet of Things (IoT) Design Considerations: Cost and Network

[fa icon='calendar'] Jan 5, 2015 7:22:39 AM / by Brittney Borowicz posted in BLE, Bluetooth, Bluetooth 4.0, Bluetooth Alliance, cellular, cellular service provider network, Cloud, connectded devices, cost, Ethernet, gateway, General, hardwares, internet, Internet of Things, internet protocol suite, IoT, IoT capabilities, IoT-enabled, manufacturers, manufacturing costs, mesh network, modules, network, oftware, TCP/IP, technology, Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi Alliance, Z-Wave, ZigBee, ZigBee Coordinator, White Papers, Wireless, Z-Wave Alliance, ZigBee Alliance

[fa icon="comment"] 0 Comments

1. Cost

Connecting products to the Internet of Things (IoT) is essential to manufacturers looking to stay competitive within their industry. Adding IoT capabilities gives consumers more features. It also allows the manufacturer to stay connected with their customer while discovering new product use cases and applications that open them up to new revenue streams. These added benefits for both parties come with a cost though. Connected devices come with higher manufacturing costs but can also be sold with a higher price tag as well.

Wi-Fi and Ethernet connections can be added to products for less than $10 in bill of materials costs. Other technologies, such as ZigBee, Z-Wave and Bluetooth, can be added for a lower price but may require a separate bridge device to get that device on the Internet to access Cloud services.

2. Network

Manufacturers have many hardware and software options when it comes to network technology for their IoT-enabled products. Some devices can be directly connected to the Internet using networking such as Ethernet and Wi-Fi, which are based on the Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP). Other products may use wireless technologies; some of which include TCP/IP, but in the end will require a “gateway” to convert the chosen network to either Ethernet or Wi-Fi. Some of the many technologies available include:

10 IoT Design Considerations - Network Technology

10IOTDESIGNCONSIDERATIONS_BANNER

>  For more information, please call Grid Connect Inc. at +1 (630) 245-1445, or email us at iot@gridconnect.com.

Read More [fa icon="long-arrow-right"]

Subscribe to Email Updates

Lists by Topic

see all