5 Points to Remember for Engaging Citizens with the Internet of Things

[fa icon="calendar"] Dec 12, 2016 2:27:51 PM / by Brittney Borowicz

Brittney Borowicz

When examining the process of the implementation of the Internet of Things (IoT) within city environments, people often focus on the technical aspects. There are five main themes in order to successfully adopt IoT technology on a large scale. The five themes for an operational IoT include:

  1. Leverage existing physical infrastructure
  2. Engage the local data ecosystem (i.e., partner with local researchers or non-profits)
  3. Employ a clear data management strategy
  4. Address security and privacy concerns with transparency
  5. Turn collected data into action

Despite the importance of the technical aspects of the IoT, it is also important to examine the non-technical aspects because it deals with the consumers that will actually be using the technology. One of the best ways to further advance technical products is by engaging with residents. This allows implementers to gather support for a projects as well as gain insight about how to make a project much more effective. Utilizing residents as a resource for developing the adoption of IoT technology should not be overlooked, regardless of how complex a project may seem. Residents can often provide new information or insight on things that haven’t been considered yet.

There are many ways to go about creating engagement efforts. One example is the Civic User Testing Group (CUTGroup), which is a group consisting of Chicago residents who are paid to test various civic websites and applications. These groups can be used as ways to engage with residents, which can lead to further development of any IoT projects. Civic engagement through groups such as the CUTGroup have allowed for technological improvements and should be seen as a tool rather than a hindrance.

In order for cities to capitalize on the future of the IoT, they will need to value the interaction between implementers and residents. Collecting feedback and information about how residents interact with technology is much more valuable than simply informing residents of how a technology works. This means that residents should not only be informed, but be able to interact with implementers and raise any questions or concerns they have. With technological growth in mind, the non-technical aspects of the IoT are just as important as the technical aspect.

Read the full article: http://www.govtech.com/fs/5-Points-to-Remember-for-Engaging-Citizens-with-the-Internet-of-Things.html

Topics: Chicago, citizens, city, General, Internet of Things, IoT, residents, Smart City

Brittney Borowicz

Written by Brittney Borowicz

Subscribe to Email Updates

Lists by Topic

see all